Louis Jadot Bonnes Mares Grand Cru 2017

£808.07
Current Price (inc. Tax)
3 bottle(s) at £269.36 per bottle.

Also available In Bond.

To purchase an In Bond product, please supply your VAT ID and address during checkout.

£660.00
In-Bond Price
3 bottle(s) at £220.00 per bottle.
In stock
SKU
XHATMJBMGR17T
 

Louis Jadot Bonnes Mares Grand Cru 2017

Chambolle Musigny lies just north of Vougeot and South of Morey Saint Denis on two steep slopes at either end of the communes which rise above the village of Chambolle in the valley between them. The Bonnes Mares vineyard lies at the edge of Chambolle Musigny and which one part spill into Morey Saint Denis.
The calcium content of the soil which gives the wines of Chambolle Musigny their great delicacy, is less pronounced, and compared to le Musigny, Bonnes Mares is more robust, yet still extremely elegant.

Louis Jadot Bonnes Mares Grand Cru 2017

Chambolle Musigny lies just north of Vougeot and South of Morey Saint Denis on two steep slopes at either end of the communes which rise above the village of Chambolle in the valley between them. The Bonnes Mares vineyard lies at the edge of Chambolle Musigny and which one part spill into Morey Saint Denis.
The calcium content of the soil which gives the wines of Chambolle Musigny their great delicacy, is less pronounced, and compared to le Musigny, Bonnes Mares is more robust, yet still extremely elegant.

Destemmed grapes ferment in vats during 3 to 4 weeks. Aging takes place in oak barrels produced by our cooperage Cadus during 18 months.

Roasted salmon, roasted chicken, grilled red meat : beef, lamb chops, osso bucco, stew, ragout, bœuf bourguignon, duck, partridge, quail, deer, young wild boar, teppanyaki beef, mashed potatoes with salted butter, Cîteaux, Mont d’Or.  

After a real winter, with truly cold temperatures (particularly in January), but with less rainfall than average, budbreak took place earlier than usual at the end of March during a superb early spring that saw vigorous vegetal growth. During the last fortnight of April, some rain fell on the already well-developed plants (many of which were already showing 3-4 leaves, sometimes more). In the Côte d’Or the frosts were less deadly than those of 2016, and were often radiative in nature (and therefore very localised). Nevertheless, they had a profound impact on Chablis, the Couchois region (to the west of the Côte Chalonnaise) and some of the hills in the north of the Maconnais, as well as southern Beaujolais and some of the slopes of the Beaujolais Villages area. Subsequently, there were a few weeks of slow growth as both the dry soils and the cool conditions meant that the vines took their time to put on a growth spurt. Some rainfall and temperatures somewhat above the norm in May gave us a reminder that the vine is, well, a vine… Growers picked up the pace in the vineyard and began lifting the canopies. At the start of June, vines in earlier-ripening areas flowered, but suffered a bit from heat stress. There was some evidence of poor fruit set, particularly when it came to the whites. The Pinot vines flowered later, in more moderate conditions, and promised well in terms of future fruiting. Overall, yields just about reached the average when it came to whites while the red harvest promised to be generous. It looked as if 2017 was set to be an early vintage, with picking due to start between the end of August and the beginning of September. We saw little in the way of disease pressure, although there were a few spots of downy mildew fairly late in the growing season, but these were quickly brought under control. There was some evidence of powdery mildew in July, but it caused little damage. Overall, summer was fine. There was little rot and the grapes ripened steadily, although the lack of rainfall (a shortfall equivalent to two whole months of rain compared to the average) began to make itself felt. In the south of the region, two hailstorms in July destroyed a large part of the potential harvest in the crus of Moulin à Vent, Chiroubles, Fleurie and Morgon, but the Côte d’Or was spared from damage. We began harvesting the whites on 2 September, a few days after we started picking the first grapes in Beaujolais. Picking took place in good conditions, with little need for triage and good levels of ripeness overall.

Beaujolais

After a December in which the weather conformed to seasonal norms, January saw a precipitous drop in temperatures, with the mercury stuck below zero for nigh on two weeks. Despite this chilly episode, the first three months of the year were fairly clement, thanks in large part to the mild weather of February and March. These conditions sparked an early awakening in the vines, with the first buds opening during the last days of March in the bush vines of la Rochelle – a whole week early on the average of the past 30 years. With the arrival of spring came the widespread realisation that we were in a period of drought that was to last several months. Favourable weather continued to dominate throughout the early weeks of April, but a dramatic change arrived around the 20th, when temperatures plunged and we began to fear a repeat of the great frosts of the previous year. Thankfully, only a few rows of Chardonnay were affected. The largely sunny conditions of April and May permitted the vines to continue their growth, and flowering began on 1 June. The end of spring unfolded in idyllic sunny, warm conditions, suggesting an early harvest along similar lines to those of 1997 and 2007. On the morning of 10 July, just as the bunches began to close up, we finished up the main viticultural tasks of the season and began to anticipate the reception of the grapes in our new winery with great excitement. Then disaster struck. At the end of the afternoon, a devastating storm ravaged most of the cru zones, from Regnié to Chénas, affecting pretty much all of our vineyards. Around the 20th of the month, while the vines were recovering from their injuries and just as the first berries became tinged with colour, a new hailstorm attacked the Côte du Py which, up until that moment, had escaped the damage unscathed. Calm weather returned in August, which allowed the vineyards to regain some of their equilibrium, and a heat spike during the last week of the month accelerated the ripening process. The rain we had been waiting for finally fell, bringing an end to the drought and creating fresher conditions that helped bring about optimal ripeness. Thick skins, rich in anthocyanins, nut-brown pips, all the elements were in place to give birth to a good vintage. The key to ultimate success was the ability to adapt ourselves to this unusual year, in which the hail had created huge disparities in the vineyards. While the first bunches in the Côte du Py were harvested on the 1st of September, we waited until the 20th to pick individual berries from the most damaged bunches and from the Syrah, the domaine’s new babies. Harvest at the Château had not taken place over such an extended period in living memory. In a nutshell, 2017, from January through to August, had provided a textbook example of the effects of climate change. The unusual weather patterns in Beaujolais, which lies at the crossroads of continental, Mediterranean and Atlantic influences, explains both the climatic extremes that affected us and the unique style of our wines. In 2017 the whites from the Clos du Loyse show a vivid brightness as well as their typical richness, and the reds, which are currently maturing, show a remarkable purity of fruit and an unusual density of flavour, a good omen for the vintage’s potential quality.

More Information
Bottles Per Case 3
Call for Price No
Price View Price Range
Vintage 2017
Write Your Own Review
You're reviewing:Louis Jadot Bonnes Mares Grand Cru 2017
Copyright © 2020 - Company Registration Number: 3875876